Text 15 Jun Next Generation Condoms

The project aims to replace latex with a new material called a “tough hydrogel,” which is a skin-like material that can be designed to be completely transparent and to act and feel like real skin. This means the material can be used instead of latex to create condoms that feel more like human skin and provide more pleasure than most existing condoms.

Dr Sina Naficy and Dr Robert Gorkin with the hydrogel material that has won funding from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to develop the next generation condom.

Hydrogels are made of water connected together by polymers, which means they are naturally wet and have a stiffness similar to that of body tissues. Hydrogels are also self-lubricated and biocompatible, which makes them safe. In fact, contact lenses are made of a type of hydrogel and different forms of hydrogel are also being used in some consumer products like shower gels and toothpaste. They can be created to be biodegradable, allowing for easy and eco-friendly disposal of the item after use.

Another research team at UOW has been working on tough and stimuli-sensitive hydrogels with unique properties that enable them to “recover from large strains and absorb energy without damage.” These tough hydrogel sheets can be made to stretch over a thousand times their size, and it is this type of tough hydrogel that is being used to develop the hydrogel condom.

Photo 14 Jun Wallpaper from Wallbase

Wallpaper from Wallbase

Link 10 Nov Popular Myth: "We Only Use 10% Of Our Brain Capacity"»

http://ift.tt/1hwG2Z3 One of the most popular myth in science history is a statement that we only utilize 10% of our brain capacity. This myth makes most people to believe that there are 90% more capabilities that are still waited to be used. Just to mention a few, telepathy, super-human regeneration or even x-ray vision.

Even though this myth is often attributed to William James (the father of Americam psychology) and Albert Einstein, it’s still unclear how this all begin. However, public were already aware of this myth in late 1930s. And just like many other pseudoscience, some authorative figures also helped the spread of this false information. During 1950s, this misleading informarion was widely (and wildly) used in many self improvement industries, even in some Dale Carnegie’s works..!

10% brain capacity might be true if we’re talking about Homer
Simpson who lives in The Simpson Universe


It could be very possible that this myth is triggered by misinterpretation on neurological studies conducted in 1930s. At that time, it was well-known that there are many researchers used electrical stimulation to figure out corelation between physical functions and brain cortex. When a certain area of animals’ cortex is stimulated, a physical response will occur. This phenomenon also happens on human. However, there are wide area of brain cortex that don’t induce physical/motoric reaction. At that time, researchers call those area as silent cortex, which possibly misinterpreted by the myth starter(s) as part of brain that are left unused or still not activated.

 

The Facts

There were neither neurologist nor researchers who interpret the phenomenon as what those myth starters thought. In fact, the silent cortex hold function for other important things rather than motoric response; such as linguistic, logical processing, and perceptions. With the current technology advancement, this 10 % myth is easily debunked. Modern brain imaging shows that every part of brain is continuously active. Certain tasks increase activity levels in particular brain area, but even we are sleeping there is no part of our brain that is inactive; unless the brain sufferring tissue damage.

The most simple yet way to counter this myth is what we can get from observing stroke or alzheimer victims, where small damage happened on small areas of the brain, yet giving a disastrous impact. Stroke victims lost about 1% of their total brain mass, while Alzheimer victims experience 10-20% cortex damage, which then lead to a complete memory and/or senses loss.

Regardless of the facts, this 10% myth is still firmly believed by the Transcendental Meditation moevement and Scientology. So, unless you are part of those beliefs, please stop saying that our brain only use 10% of its capacity.

Further Reading: 
Beyerstein, B. L. “Whence Cometh the Myth That We Only Use 10% of Our Brains?” In S. Della Sala, ed. Mind Myths: Exploring Popular Assumptions about the Mind and Brain. New York: Wiley, 1999, pp. 3–24.
Video 4 Nov 37 notes

Finding the Ocean Inside an Opal

Opal is a hydrated amorphous form of silica. Its water content may range from 3% to 21% by weight, but is usually between 6% to 10%.

Because of its amorphous character it is classed as a mineraloid, unlike the other crystalline forms of silica which are classed as minerals. It is deposited at a relatively low temperature and may occur in the fissures of almost any kind of rock, being most commonly found with limonite, sandstone, rhyolite, marl and basalt.

Opal is the national gemstone of Australia, which produces 97% of the world’s supply. The internal structure of precious opal makes it diffract light; depending on the conditions in which it formed it can take on many colors. Precious opal ranges from clear through white, gray, red, orange, yellow, green, blue, magenta, rose, pink, slate, olive, brown, and black. Of these hues, the reds against black are the most rare, whereas white and greens are the most common. It varies in optical density from opaque to semi-transparent.

Taken from: TwistedSifter

Photo 19 Oct 2 notes The Standard Model Of Particle Physics
The world’s most sought-after particle is the missing piece of the Standard Model, the best theory available for how the universe works in all its aspects bar gravity (which is the province of Albert Einstein’s general relativity).
The model divides elementary particles into two classes:
Fermions, a group comprising quarks (like those which make up protons and neutrons in atomic nuclei) and leptons (such as electrons that orbit these nuclei, and ghostly neutrinos).
The bosons: gauge bosons, which carry forces of nature that allow the fermions to interact, and the Higgs boson, whose role is to endow the others with mass.
The concept of the Higgs was introduced in 1964, so it has taken physicists 48 years to go from idea to observation. None of the model’s 16 other particles was as elusive. Indeed, as the chart shows, the muon and the tau were discovered before anyone had predicted their existence. Both are leptons, heavier versions of the familiar electron, the first elementary particle to be observed, by J.J. Thomson, a Briton, in 1897.
Though the notion of a unit of negative charge had been around since the 1830s, a firmer prediction was made in 1881 by a German scientist, Hermann von Helmholz. The positron, the electron’s antimatter twin (not included in our chart, since in terms of the Standard Model, particles and their antiversions are two sides of a single coin) popped out of an equation in 1928; it popped up in an experiment four years later.

The Standard Model Of Particle Physics

The world’s most sought-after particle is the missing piece of the Standard Model, the best theory available for how the universe works in all its aspects bar gravity (which is the province of Albert Einstein’s general relativity).

The model divides elementary particles into two classes:

  1. Fermions, a group comprising quarks (like those which make up protons and neutrons in atomic nuclei) and leptons (such as electrons that orbit these nuclei, and ghostly neutrinos).

  2. The bosons: gauge bosons, which carry forces of nature that allow the fermions to interact, and the Higgs boson, whose role is to endow the others with mass.

The concept of the Higgs was introduced in 1964, so it has taken physicists 48 years to go from idea to observation. None of the model’s 16 other particles was as elusive. Indeed, as the chart shows, the muon and the tau were discovered before anyone had predicted their existence. Both are leptons, heavier versions of the familiar electron, the first elementary particle to be observed, by J.J. Thomson, a Briton, in 1897.

Though the notion of a unit of negative charge had been around since the 1830s, a firmer prediction was made in 1881 by a German scientist, Hermann von Helmholz. The positron, the electron’s antimatter twin (not included in our chart, since in terms of the Standard Model, particles and their antiversions are two sides of a single coin) popped out of an equation in 1928; it popped up in an experiment four years later.

Photo 18 Oct 2 notes Laws Of Motion
In the absence of an unbalanced forced, an object at rest remains at rest and an object already in motion remainds inmotion with constant speed in a straight line path.
The acceleration of an object is directly proportional to the unbalanced force acting on it and is iversely proportional to the object mass. The direction of the acceleration is the same as direction of the unbalanced force. F= m.a
For every action there is an equal and opposite reaction
taken from: Visual.ly

Laws Of Motion

  1. In the absence of an unbalanced forced, an object at rest remains at rest and an object already in motion remainds inmotion with constant speed in a straight line path.

  2. The acceleration of an object is directly proportional to the unbalanced force acting on it and is iversely proportional to the object mass. The direction of the acceleration is the same as direction of the unbalanced force. F= m.a

  3. For every action there is an equal and opposite reaction

taken from: Visual.ly

Link 17 Oct 261 notes Neuroscience: Physical Attractiveness Impacts One's Memory»

neurosciencestuff:

A study at Texas Christian University in Fort Worth has found that the attractiveness of others can have an impact on how much we lie or misrepresent and to the extent that we believe those lies/misrepresentations.

For example, Harry gets a call from a political polling organization and is asked…

Video 16 Oct 2,320 notes

odditiesoflife:

Visual Perception Video Creates Strange After-Effects

WARNING: Do not watch this video if you suffer from photosensitive epilepsy.

This trippy but very cool video from ScienceForum has been made to experience mild hallucinogenic (visual distortion) effects upon termination of the video. If you watch the video and follow the instructions exactly, you should experience visual waves and distortions for approximately from 5-10 seconds after the video’s completion. The repetitive patterns in the video create recurring psychological stimulation that continues after the video has stopped. If you spell out the letters in the video, there is a hidden message. Also the effects are much better if you view it on full screen. Have fun!

Source ScienceForum

Photo 15 Oct 1 note More the knowledge, Lesser The Ego; Lesser the knowledge, more the Ego
taken from: Ayo Berbuatbaik

More the knowledge, Lesser The Ego; Lesser the knowledge, more the Ego

taken from: Ayo Berbuatbaik

Quote 14 Oct 354 notes
A good scientist is a person with original ideas. A good engineer is a person who makes a design that works with as few original ideas as possible.

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